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Event

Rear View Mirror 2016

14th December 2016 — by Steve White

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It pains me to admit it, but sometimes there are very rare occasions when motorsport isn’t the most important thing in life. I’m immensely proud of everything I have achieved this year but, in order to fit it all in, compromises had to be made with regards to the number of motorsport excursions I was able to make in 2016.

Knowing that I’d be unable to attend the quantity of events I wanted, my focus for this year instead shifted to ensuring that the quality of those outings I could make was as high as possible.

Despite the aforementioned compromises, I was at least able to get 2016 underway in the usual fashion: with rallycross of course! Round 2 of the British Rallycross Championship  also constituted part of the Belgian Rallycross Championship, so there were good entry numbers throughout the multiple Championship classes.

It was great to see the return of several British Championship stalwarts alongside a number of fresh faces. There was a notably high rate of attrition in the Supercar category, with several of the title favourites encountering difficulties throughout the day.

As the familiar names fell by the wayside, it was Supercar rookie Dan Rooke who made his way to the front of the field and went on to take the win. With Lydden marking his second podium finish in as many rounds, it was an early indication that Rooke was going to be one to watch.

From the mixed surfaces of Lydden, my next stop for 2016 was the hallowed tarmac of Brands Hatch for the first round of the British GT Championship. British GT seems to be in great health at the moment, with each round of the National Championship attracting large and varied entries. The presence of several BMW Z4’s on the grid at Brands really served as the icing on the cake, as I just can’t get enough of BMW Motorsports hardcore take on Barbie’s favourite Bimmer.

The opening British GT round gave me my first chance to see the GT3 variant of the Lamborghini Huracan in the metal and I liked it. I liked it a lot. The sound wasn’t quite on par with my beloved Z4 GT3 but, in terms of looks, the Huracan definitely gives the BMW a run for its money.

Barely a month had passed since my British GT outing when I found myself heading back to Brands to once again savour the sights and sounds of GT3 cars. The second round of the Blancpain GT Sprint Cup marked a rather significant milestone in the history of GT3 racing: it was 10 years to the weekend since the competitive debut of the class. The success of GT3 was reflected in the entry list, which was far greater in size than it had been on past visits to Brands Hatch.

As well as a packed main grid, the 2016 Blancpain round at Brands also boasted a much fuller support package than previous years. The Sport Club race was hugely entertaining, though it was the cars of the Hyperclub that proved the biggest draw to spectators. Not only were there a plethora of exotics present in the paddock, but many of them were taken out on track for a damn good thrashing.

Mettet would be one of three World Rallycross Championship rounds I was able to attend in 2016 and Belgium was the first occasion I could lay eyes on the M-Sport Ford Focus RS RX. I personally rate the M-Sport Fiesta as the best looking car in the current crop of rally and rallycross cars, so I was eager to see how the Focus compared.

Hoonigan Racing team mates Ken Block and Andreas Bakkerud were both plagued by technical gremlins but, amidst the problems, glimpses of the true capability of the car could be seen.

Few were surprised to see the big names at the front end of the field in the World Championship races, but it was the success of the younger drivers in the European Championship battles that caught many by surprise. Defending European Champion Tommy Rustad looked outpaced by the likes of Joni-Pekka Rajala and Kevin Hansen. Much like Dan Rooke, Kevin Hansen was a name that rallycross spectators would become very familiar with in 2016.

Round four of the World Rallycross Championship took place at Lydden Hill just a fortnight after Belgium. Andreas Bakkerud demonstrated how rapidly development of the Focus RS RX was progressing, with a surge of pace that saw him qualify on the back row of the final. Mechanical woes would prevent him from challenging for a podium spot, but it was a clear sign that Bakkerud was ready to enter the fray as a serious title challenger.

Petter Solberg just pipped Matias Ekstrom to victory at Lydden last year and it looked like he would do the same again in 2016, with Solberg falling just short of a perfect set of qualifying races and absolutely blitzing the field in his semi-final. Ekstrom is a wily opponent though and in the final he edged out Petter by the narrowest of margins to take his third successive win of the season.

There were a plethora of Americas finest to ogle at American Speedfest IV but, for the second year in a row, it was the brutal Formula 5000 machinery that stole the show for me. The raw simplicity of these cars illustrates everything that is wrong with the current crop of premier open wheel racing cars.

I was unable to get my Le Mans fix in 2015 and the withdrawal hit me hard, so I was desperate not to miss out again in 2016. Le Mans never fails to disappoint and there was close racing throughout the classes, however it was the fight in LMP1 that proved most memorable. 12 hours in and the top three were just seconds apart. In the latter stages of the race the number 5 Toyota managed to stretch out a slim lead and victory looked assured…

…but with just 6 minutes to go, the TS050 began to slow, before grinding to a halt by the pit wall. The ending of the 2016 24 hours of Le Mans was absolutely heart breaking to watch, where even rival teams expressed sympathy for the distraught Japanese manufacturer. Still, although Porsche may have stood on the top step of the podium, the unclassified Toyota is the car I’ll remember.

My list of “must see” car shows has slowly dwindled over the years, but the Festival of Speed is one of the few exceptions. Even after a decade of attendance, I still cite it as an essential weekend for any motorsport fan. Virtually every discipline is represented in some form and, whatever your preference, I guarantee there will be at least one vehicle there to excite you.

As the car that ignited my passion for motorsport, watching Ryan Champion slide his Group A Impreza around the (critically underrated) Goodwood Forest Rally Stage was my personal highlight of the day. I’m sure many people in attendance were cursing the grey skies, but as the precipitation greatly reduced the grips levels on the rally stage, I was silently praising the wet stuff.

I considered myself very fortunate to get an invitation to the inaugural 6R4.net track day in 2015, so I was flattered to be invited back again in 2016. The formula of the event remained largely unchanged from 2015 but, given how much I had enjoyed that, I wasn’t complaining!

Heavy showers during the afternoon did little to dampen the enthusiasm of the drivers and the cars continued to run in the driving rain. It was a privilege to be able to watch the owners put these valuable classics through their paces and I was especially grateful to them for continuing to show off despite the slippery track conditions.

The August Bank Holiday round of the British Rallycross Championship has been a mainstay of my annual motorsport agenda for a decade now and, as long as it continues to deliver great racing, rallycross will always be my priority.

Proving that his win at round 2 was no fluke, Dan Rooke took a lights-to-flag victory in the Supercar final at round 6. Rooke maintained his form at the subsequent round of the Championship, where he claimed second place and, with it, the 2016 British Rallycross Championship. Dan is the youngest ever driver to take the British Championship and I hope we see him back to defend his title – and perhaps even challenge some of Europe’s finest – in 2017.

As the World Rallycross Championship passed its midpoint, the Championship battle was impossible to call. Petter Solberg arrived at round 8 in Loheac as the points leader, but he was unable to match the pace of his closest rival, Mattias Ekstrom, and by the end of the qualification stage Ekstrom had reduced the point deficit between the title rivals to zero.

Neither Ekstrom nor Solberg would set foot on the podium though. With Ekstrom failing to make it past the semi-final stage, Johan Kristoffersson fended off all challengers and led the final from start to finish. The damp conditions produced the best days racing I have seen at Loheac and made for a great conclusion to my World Rallycross Championship attendance in 2016.

World Rallycross weekends have consistently been the highlight of my motorsport expeditions over the last few years and I’m desperate to fit as many of them as possible into 2017.

As the summer drew to a close, it became apparent that my year had been rather lacking in two wheeled motorsport, but a trip to Swingfield in September was to rectify that. Not only was I able to check out some very sideways motorcycles, but the program at the European Grasstrack Final also incorporated two classes of sidecars as well.

The solo riders were fantastic to watch, but it was the sidecars that made the biggest impression. Watching a 1000cc sidecar tearing up a field is an incredible spectacle and I am certain that my first visit to a grasstrack event won’t be my last.

With the end of the season looming, I had just enough time left to sneak a visit in to my most local motocross track, Canada Heights, for the final round of the British Sidecarcross and Quad Championship. The sidecars here may not have been quite as rapid (or sideways) as their grasstrack counterparts, but what they lacked in speed they made up for with altitude.

However the highest fliers of the day were undoubtedly the quad riders. I briefly rode a quad on the flat and felt that a trip to casualty was an inevitability, so I have a great deal of respect for the British Quad Championship riders. Flinging a quad through the trees is a tricky task in itself: and that is before you factor in the other 30 lunatics all trying to do the same thing!

My final outing of the year was a slight deviation to the norm in that it concerned virtual, rather than physical, racing. Two years ago I was fortunate enough to be able to drop into Codemasters studio in Southam and I returned again in late November for another behind the scenes look at proceedings.  Much awesomeness was demonstrated and many cool things were seen: but that’s about all I’m legally allowed to tell you!

Despite containing far less motoring content than I would have liked, 2016 has definitely been a year where quality has triumphed over quantity. When compiling end-of-year reviews in the past I have often omitted events that have fallen short of my expectations, but everything I attended this year has seemed worthy of mention.

Typically I would bemoan the lack of motorsport over the winter, but I’m actually rather grateful for it this year: the more work I can do during the quiet spell now, the more events I should be able to fit into 2017!

 

Want to see more? Click here for the full albums from 2016.

Event

6R4.net Track Day – Curborough

18th July 2016 — by Steve White

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 “Beginners luck” is an expression I’m sure most are familiar with and something that everyone is sure to have experienced at least once in their life. Sometimes things just fall into place on the first attempt and, no matter how hard you try to duplicate the same conditions, the results are never as good.

It was the notion of beginners luck that was foremost on my mind as I began the long trek North to Curborough Sprint Circuit for the second 6R4.net track day. Last year’s inaugural 6R4.net meet was unquestionably one of my personal highlights of 2015 and rated among the most enjoyable days I have ever spent at a track. I had zero expectations for last year’s event though and, with the bar raised so high, could a repeat event prove as memorable?

The allocation of invitations in 2015 had been carefully monitored and, although not everyone invited had been directly connected to the individual drivers or cars, all shared a strong passion for rally cars, especially the boxy hatchback from Longbridge. The result was a day that straddled a fine line between enthusiast’s convention and club track day.

Speaking to 6R4.net event organiser Nicky Lindon before the event, it was clear that retaining the balance of  last years event had weighed heavily on his mind. Although there was a strong temptation to open the doors to a wider audience, doing so would clearly have resulted in a very different day. By sticking to the same format as before, the relaxed atmosphere for both drivers and spectators would be preserved.

Upon arrival at Curborough something that quickly became apparent was an increased air of confidence from the organisation team. I mean that in an entirely positive sense as, when I first arrived at last year’s event, there was clearly concern that some – or perhaps even none – of the drivers who had expressed an interest in the track day would actually show up. Thankfully many of them did and, after the success of 2015, a strong turnout seemed assured this time around.

With a basic event structure established last year, more attention had been paid to the little details for 2016. The circuit configuration was better defined to drivers, cars heading onto track were now individually numbered for ease of identification, programmes were issued to everyone and (most importantly I would say) bacon sandwiches were now available on site. These were all minor improvements, but all served to make the experience that much more enjoyable.

The familiarity of proceedings (or perhaps it was the bacon sandwiches) seemed to put the owners at ease as well. Some drivers had seemed hesitant to christen the track in 2015, but there were no signs of reluctance this year. Cars were on track from the moment the circuit opened right up to the minute the gate was closed. There seemed to be a lot more enthusiastic driving this time as well, with many drivers making the most of the wide exit on Fradley Hairpin.

In the weeks building up to the track day I had been tipped off that a handful of non-MG’s would once again be invited in order to add a bit of variety to the paddock. However I had wrongly assumed that these would all be Group B cars, thus I was rather surprised to see an icon of the Group 4 era unloading in the paddock.

The Lancia Stratos is one of the great shapes of rallying and Nigel Wilkinson’s replica looked absolutely stunning. I thought the choice of colours was absolutely spot on, with the white, red and green scheme reminiscent enough of the famous Alitalia livery to seem familiar, but different enough to give the car it’s own unique look.

After an overcast morning and a brief spell of sunshine during lunch, the skies turned grey and the track was saturated by rain. Given the rarity of the cars in attendance (and the fact that most of them were shod with slick tyres) I had been expecting things to go quiet once it got damp. These owners had bought their cars along to drive though and, despite the heavy precipitation, that’s exactly what they carried on doing.

With a steady flow of cars on circuit throughout the afternoon, I quickly lost track of time and, when I realized how late in the day it was, I had run out of time to roam around the paddock and pester drivers for a passenger ride. Fortunately owner David Seaton happened to spot me trackside and, despite being saturated from the rain showers, offered me the passenger seat of his RS200S. My long standing love affair with the RS200 is something I touched on in my last blog  and, after experiencing the passenger seat of a competition specification RS200 at last year’s event, I was very interested to see how the road version compared.

Considering the road variant of a Group B car purely by it’s numbers and you could be forgiven for being a little underwhelmed. 300 BHP certainly isn’t anything to be sniffed at, but it’s far from an unobtainable power figure by modern standards. Judging these cars on numbers alone is rather missing the point though. The production versions may sport interior trim and carpets, but that doesn’t disguise the fact these are raw competition machines at heart.

Yes, you could go out and buy a car tomorrow with similar power figures, but nothing available in a showroom can offer you the same motorsport pedigree. I have lost count of the number of times I have seen the expression “race car for the road” used in marketing blurb, but said cars will always be based on compromise. Merely road cars with some race inspired extras tacked on. The Group B era was a rare moment in time, when the race car came first and the showroom model played second fiddle.

On the subject of race cars on the road, it would be rude not to mention Rob Hill. Rob was one of the most entertaining drivers on track during the inaugural 6R4.net gathering, so I was glad to see him back again for 2016. As with last year Rob drove his car to the circuit, gave it a damn good thrashing on track and then drove it back home again at the end of the day.

As committed as Rob was, Mark Holmes had to take this year’s prize for most entertaining driver of the day. Wet or dry I don’t think Mark drove a single run without at least one big slide. I am appreciative to all the owners for showing their cars off, but I am particularly grateful to those who are willing to push them up to (and occasionally beyond!) their limit.

Sequels that are better than the original are a rare thing, but I thought the chaps at 6R4.net absolutely nailed it. Although it would have been fantastic for more people to be able to experience the event, opening the gates to the public would have immediately changed the atmosphere, effectively turning a unique track day into just another car show.

So can they master the challenge of the difficult third album and make it three in a row? Fingers crossed that I will get an invitation again next year to see for myself!

Want to see more of the Metro 6R4 track day? Click here for a full image gallery,

Event

AwesomeBoss 2016 Gallery

3rd July 2016 — by Andi Gordon

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Not every event is a blog. Some just don’t have the substance to do any kind of reporting on, or offer opinion. Some events it’s difficult to get the vibe of. Some events you just want to take pictures and not bother about all that other stuff. AwesomeBoss 2016 at Driftland is an event I don’t think I can do a blog on, but I did take a bunch of pictures, and here they are….

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Event

Drift AllStars Rnd1 – Middle East

1st June 2016 — by Dan Fegent

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Drifting can take you to some amazing places and there is no place more awe-inspiring than under the floodlights of the Yas Marina Circuit in Abu Dhabi.

The F1 circuit is iconic, it might not be steeped in years of motorsport ghosts and tales of yesterday, but none the less it’s one that has a certain charm and distinguished look and feel. So, when we heard that the first round of Drift Allstars had tee’d up the venue as the start of it’s World Championship we had to make sure we got along to capture the action.

In a field of over 30 drivers made up from international & locals, names that would jump out on the entry sheet where, Ireland’s Nigel Colfer, Norway’s Fredrik Øksnevad and UK’s Steve ‘Baggsy’ Biagioni, the UAE team of Lunatics By Nature ( Sultan Al Qassimi, Khalifa Sultan & Dany Neville), Kuwait’s Ali Makhseed and Jordan’s Ahmad Daham.

As the golden haze of natural sunlight faded, the floodlit track formed the battle ground and those who’d headed out were in for a treat! It was UK’s Steve ‘Baggsy’ Biagioni that took the number 1 qualifier position as he and his newly LS powered S13 took to the fast paced circuit with ease, with the first place qualifier also coming in with a direct buy into the great 8 and facing his first battle against the impressive Ali Makhseed.

However, It was local driver, Sultan Al Qassimi that looked to be on point in his distinguished looking Nissan S14, however it was an incredibly tight battle with Fredrik Øksnevad that ended his campaign to move on any further into the competition. Fredrik pitched an onslaught in his Tri-Ace V8 Soarer, but when he met Baggsy in the Semi Finals he just couldn’t match that of the UK wheelman.

Real drama on the black-top came from Nigel Colfer and Ahmad Daham – the two drivers ran incredibly hard, they had contact as they pushed on each other through their battles and the judges struggled to make a decision calling One More Time (OMT) twice. However, it was the crowd’s favourite, Daham, in his 900hp Nissan S15 that would nudge the win over Colfer and progress to take on Baggsy in the final.

The final also didn’t come without drama for Daham. Calling a five minute rule, the team scrabbled about to make some adjustments to his car before facing the Monster Energy S13 of Biagioni. Making the line and the start Baggsy kept a fast clean line and pulled a huge leading gap on Daham and a massive advantage into the chase run. Daham’s car maybe still with issues was no match this weekend and the chase run was a formality passing the podium to the UK diver. Nigel Colfer would join them on the top spot in third place and the closing ceremony of the first round of Drift Allstars. We’re looking forward to round two and seeing who will bring the heat