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Skiddin’ at Lydden

12th December 2016 — by Dave Cox

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Back in December 2015, Lydden Hill Race Circuit took the decision to close public drift days. Not an easy decision to make but complaints from the surrounding residents as well as a few people not being respectful on the local roads made is unfortunately necessary. Lydden Hill can’t really be blamed for taking this decision, it was putting the reputation with sponsors at risk

I don’t drift myself but I do photograph my fair share of drifting, so as minor grumble, I lost my “practice” days. There was also the social aspect of it, I have a lot friends that drift themselves and it was always good to catch up at the circuit and see how their home grown cars were progressing.

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But rather spend time talking about seemingly meek complaints, I thought it would be good to get some perspective from someone who was affected. A good friend of ours at Fueltopia is Paul Beechey who drifts with a group of friends under Team Lowmileage.

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Paul, cast your mind back to late 2015, Lydden Hill regrettably makes the decision to shut public, what does this mean for you?

PB: I remember thinking this is real bad for drifting in the UK, with many venues shutting their doors in the past 5 years this was another one on the list. There was always whispers in the background that it would make a comeback just not in the current form which would always be a good thing for me personally.

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Clearly this was bigger than just a single venue closing it’s doors, more of a general decline nationwide. What was it about the “current form” which wasn’t a good thing for you?

PB: The old way Lydden used to be was some what chaotic with tons of “missiles” in wrong groups etc. Impacting on seat time due to many red flags and stopped sessions. There was none of that on Saturday, the open pit format worked so well, option of twinning and trains if wanted. Otherwise it was solo passes which really took the pressure off.

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Wow, so in the time they shut public drift days, they revised how the sessions would have been run.

It is fair to say that when Lydden announced the return of public drift days but at a revised and higher price point, it was met with scepticism. What would you say to those people after testing the new format?

PB: So far the new format appears to be working, the last practice day was seat time central and the new pricing was totally justified with the amount of time on track. I think Lydden will be improving on the format and all the time we are heading in this direction it’s a winner for the UK scene.

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Glad to hear that it has come back stronger than before. So what happened with the noise complaints? Did Lydden have to make a deal with the local council to shorten the drift sessions? Or have they introduced tighter noise limits?

PB: The noise complaints will always be there. Lydden are running only 4 cars at a time max now and there is no drifting on chessons corner which is a real tyre saver. I know it takes the whole matsuri kinda vibe away from full circuit drifting but it still works. They have released another date with another new format. It looks promising and Lydden have really hit it on the head with an open track format. Good work Hannah and the team!

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 Sometimes your hand is forced and you have to go back and rethink things. Lydden Hill’s drift days were nothing short of popular in the past but there was always room for improvement. Having to call an early halt to them allowed Hannah and the team to sit down and re-evaluate things. Judging by Paul’s feedback it would see this was time well spent. I am happy to see the drift days return. The South East has a large drift community and it would be a shame to have it taken away.
I just need to get down there and see the new format for myself.
Words: Paul Beechey and Dave Cox
Pictures: James Tremain and Dave Cox

Event

British Rallycross Championship Round 6 – Lydden Hill

13th September 2016 — by Steve White

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Every round in a race Championship is significant, but the way drivers choose to approach a given event can vary immensely. In the latter stages of a Championship consistency often becomes more crucial than outright pace. For those chasing the leader every remaining round must be attacked as hard as possible in to reduce the point deficit, whereas those out front will seek to take as few risks as possible in order to preserve their lead.

As the British Rallycross Championship nears the end of its current season several drivers are now within sight of their respective class titles, so there were clearly mixed approaches being taken by the field at round 6 of the Championship.

One of the drivers keen to preserve his position was Dan Rooke. Dan’s remarkable performance in his debut year at the helm of rallycross Supercar has seen him claim a Championship lead which the more seasoned competitors have been unable to wrestle back from him.

Having won round 2 back in March, Rooke has a 100% success rate at Lydden in a rallycross Supercar. The last two August rallycross meets at Lydden have both been won by Ollie O’Donovan and, with thirteen Supercars entered in the class, both Ollie and Dan would have a full grid to fend off if they hoped to be first over the line again.

One name that was conspicuous by its absence from the Supercar entry was Dave Newsham. In the days leading up to round 6 the Power Maxed Racing team announced their withdrawal from the 2016 British Rallycross Championship. It’s a real shame that Newsham wasn’t able to complete the season as I had hoped the team would be able to iron the creases out of the ex-Marcin Wicik supercar.

Entry numbers in the Super National class were also strong, with season-long contenders joined by a number of familiar faces, including Gary Simpson who was making his first British Rallycross Championship appearance of the year and Stuart Emery, who was competing for the first time since injuring himself back in May.

Neither Emery nor Simpson could boast the longest hiatus from rallycross though. That accolade was firmly in the hands of Paul Easterbrook, who returned to rallycross for the first time in a decade. Alas, Paul retired early in the day, but I hope it won’t be another 10 years before his distinctive MR2 is back on track.

The Swift Sport Championship is at its most entertaining when the grids are full, so it was pleasing to see seventeen Swifts present at Lydden Hill. Among the numerous entrants was Barrel Sprint champion and Fueltopia fave Luke Woodham, making his rallycross debut at round 6.

In all 87 cars were set to appear at Lydden, which was a very respectable number for a National Championship event. Of course the only issue with this total – and this has been a reoccurring criticism of the British Rallycross Championship for several years now – was that those entries were spread across nine classes. Still, although the numbers weren’t huge in every class, there were at least enough cars to fill a grid. Sensibly the small Super 1600 entry was merged in with the Super Modified class for the heats, with just the final to be run separately…

…as it turned out though, the Super 1600 final was to be a non-event. Casualties claimed virtually the entire field and Tristan Ovenden was the sole surviving Super 1600 car at the end of the day. It was a rather lucky break for defending Super 1600 Champion Craig Lomax who, despite breaking a gearbox, managed to last long enough into the day to claim some Championship points and preserve his hopes of taking the title again this year.

Sam Jones had been the driver to beat in the Junior Swift Championship, but the mid-season arrival of Tom Llewellin put an end to Jones winning streak. Llewellin looked untouchable at Lydden, winning all three heats and the final by a comfortable margin. Tom joined this year’s Championship too late to challenge for the title, but if his current run continues then a fourth place finish looks more than achievable.

Second place was taken by Tom Constantine with Junior Championship leader Sam Jones placing third. As a consequence Constantine now trails Jones for the Championship lead by just three points, so the Junior title looks set to go down to the wire.

Kris and Keifer Hudson have been neck-and-neck in the 2016 BMW MINI Championship. Unfortunately Keifer was unable to challenge his brother for another win at Lydden as his car suffered a mechanical issue in the final, leaving Kris free to concentrate on collecting as many points as possible. Despite the absence of his brother Keifer, Kris continued to drive on (and occasional over) the limit which was evidence by a couple of very spectacular moments on the loose.

Even with his big push, it wasn’t Kris who would stand on the top step of the podium. Victory in the BMW MINI class was taken by last year’s Junior Swift Champion Bradley Durdin on his maiden drive in a BMW MINI. It was an impressive debut from Durdin and an early sign that the Hudson clan may face a new challenger in 2017. Second for Kris was enough to take the championship lead from Keifer and, no matter what the rest of the field are doing, I’m sure the siblings will be fighting up until the end of the season for the title.

With no Rob Gibson to contend with, Barry Stewart and Ray Morgan went at it for honours in the Retro Rallycross Championship. Morgan was close to Stewarts pace throughout, but Barry just took the win.

It was business as usual for Chrissy Palmer in the RX150 buggies, with Chrissy taking his sixth consecutive victory of 2016. Second for Stephen Jones was enough to bring him within one point of Jake Harris in the Championship standings and, with Palmer now holding an almost unassailable lead, the fight for second is going to be the main focus of the last two rounds of the Championship.

After winning at round 5 in Belgium, Tony Lynch came to Lydden with an increased lead in the Super National Championship. Lynch looked the man to beat, but several entrants seemed like they had the speed to challenge Tony, particularly Steve Cozens at the helm of the very rapid ex-James Bird Renault Clio V6. Sadly Cozens was to be denied victory whilst leading the final, as his Clio died in the closing stages of the race.

Paige Bellerby seems to be gradually getting the better of her Exige, but the dinky Lotus seemingly takes no prisoners when on the limit and, while fighting with Allan Tapscott for second, the tail happy Exige caught Paige out and she dropped down the order. That allowed Tapscott to go on and take second from Stuart Emery, who had a race long fight with Mike Howlin for third.

Second was the best result of the season for Allan Tapscott and third a fine return to form for Stuart Emery after several months out of action.

With fastest times in all three heats, first in his semi-final and first in the final it was a perfect weekend for Tony Lynch, netting him a maximum haul of points and furthering his lead of the Super National Championship. He hasn’t yet moved beyond the reach of second and third position title challengers Paige Bellerby and Guy Corner, but just a few more points should be enough to secure the 2016 title.

Nathan Heathcote arrived at Lydden with a slender lead from Aidan Hills and Simon Ovenden in the Swift Sport Championship. While Nathan enjoyed a trouble free day, both Hills and Ovenden encountered issues which resulted in Simon failing to make the final and Aidan placing eighth.

The greatest challenge to Heathcote instead came from Darren Scott, who made his first appearance in the Swifts of 2016. The pair were close throughout the day, but Nathan managed to shake off Darren in the final to take a comfortable win and open up a significant lead in the Championship.

After finding his feet in the opening heat race, Luke Woodham was forced to miss his second heat before coming back out again for heat three. With his pace increasing throughout the first Swift semi-final, Luke was just one spot away from qualifying for the final. Ninth overall was a respectable debut and I have my fingers crossed it won’t be long before we see the Fueltopia liveried Swift sitting on the grid of a final!

Following a successful weekend in Belgium, Graham Rumsey was just a few points shy of seizing the Hot Hatch Championship lead from Tomasz Wielgosz. Qualifying first put Rumsey on the front row of the final and a good result seemed assured… right up to the moment when Mariusz Mehlberg ploughed into the side of Rumsey and ended his race.

Mehlberg was subsequently excluded from the meeting and with Robert Potyra winning and Wielgosz finishing third, the damage to Rumsey’s championship challenge was minimized. Sadly the same couldn’t be said for Graham’s Saxo, which is going to need some serious attention before Pembrey. The team have promised the car will be straight again for round 7, so I wish them the best of luck!

It was refreshing to see some of the rallycross veterans back on the pace in the Supercars. Pat Doran seemed to have the bit between his teeth in the ex-Liam Doran Citroen C4 and he was flying during the heats. Steve Hill also had a pleasingly trouble free day of racing and he actually flew in the semi-final after clipping the curb on the exit of the chicane.

After taking second place in the second semi-final, Hill went on to finish fifth in the final. Having persisting with the Evo X for so long I found it immensely satisfying to see Hill scoring Championship points in the car, so I can only imagine how good a decent result must feel for Steve!

Despite having his first heat time ruined by a puncture, Dan Rooke still managed to qualify second having placed second and first in heats two and three respectively. It was no surprise to see the top qualification spot go to defending Champion Julian Godfrey, who looked very much on form with top-three times in all heats.

Unfortunately round 5 was either a feast or famine for early season favourite Kevin Procter. Fastest time in heat 1 was followed by technical issues with the car and, although he managed to qualify for the final, Procter chose to relinquish his spot on the back row of the grid.

After winning his semi-final, Rooke lined up on the front row of the final alongside Ollie O’Donovan and Julian Godfrey. Godfrey looked to make a move on Rooke as the pack headed into the first corner, but Julian drifted wide, gifting Rooke some breathing space: and that was all he needed. As Godfrey was swallowed up by the chasing pack, Dan drove a clean race out front and went on to take the checkered flag almost 5 seconds ahead of the next car.

Second place was contested right up until the last corner. David Bellerby snatched the position from Godfrey on the first lap and had to defend right up to the line. The result elevates Bellerby to third in the Championship standings and, having denied Godfrey another point, means that Rooke has extended his Championship lead.

Lydden yielded the perfect result for Tony Lynch, Dan Rooke and Nathan Heathcote, as all three managed to not only retain the lead of their respectively classes, but extend them.

With just two rounds of the Championship left, the need for consistency will increase that little bit more, a task that will surely become even more difficult as the rest of the field push harder in the hope of forcing a mistake. It should be an interesting end to what has been a hard-fought season in the British Rallycross Championship!

 

Want to see more of the British Rallycross Championship at Lydden? Click here for a full image gallery.

Event

World Rallycross Championship Round 4 – Lydden Hill

22nd June 2016 — by Steve White

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I have to begin this blog with an apology, as there is likely to be an air of nostalgia to what you are about to read. Ten years ago, with a shiny new driving license in my hand, I took a drive to a relatively unheard of circuit in Kent to watch a motorsport that the internet told me had died in the mid 90’s.

To say that day proved a revelation is somewhat of an understatement. Rallycross wasn’t a sport that was confined to archive footage on You Tube, it was something that was happening right now and, unlike rallying, at a circuit barely an hour away from home.

A decade has passed since that weekend and much has changed in that time. My passion for rallycross remains as strong as ever though and the sport currently has a greater presence in the mainstream conscience then it has for many years. Seeing the awnings of the World Rallycross teams packed into the paddock at Lydden Hill seems a far cry from the clubman competitors I first watched running their race efforts from the back of a Transit van.

Equally it seemed hard to believe the personalities present at the circuit. Ten years ago I was watching drivers who were well known to rallycross fans, but whose names meant nothing to anyone outside the sport. Solberg, Loeb and Block could all be reasonably considered to be household names and here they all were, at the sleepy little Kent circuit where my passion for the sport was first ignited.

Tanner Foust, fresh from victory at the first and second rounds of the Global Rallycross Championship, joined the other star names at Lydden Hill for his first European rallycross appearance of 2016.

I was honestly a bit disappointed with Foust at Lydden last year as,  based on some of his past performances in the UK – which included victories in both 2012 and 2013 – he just didn’t look on the pace. Alas success was to elude Foust once again. Having been plagued by electrical problems on the first day, the issues persisted into day two and Foust was forced to throw in the towel before the third qualifying round began.

Johan Kristoffersson was another driver who doesn’t seem to have fortune on his side. In fact Kristoffersson seems to have encountered bad luck at every round of the 2016 season thus far, receiving bumps and breakages at the most inopportune moments.

Johan once again delivered the goods in the qualifying rounds at Lydden, but trouble in the second semi-final saw him fail to finish the race. I hope Kristoffersson gets a break soon, as he certainly isn’t lacking in pace, just luck!

In the time that has passed since my first trip to Lydden, I’ve tried to sample as many facets of motorsport as possible. However I’m still yet to find anything that provides the same sensory overload as a rallycross Supercar race. From the bassy rumble of anti-lag and the flutter of turbos, the soundtrack for a Supercar race is absolutely unforgettable.

It’s not just the sound of rallycross Supercars that I find so captivating, it’s the sheer aggression of these cars that always astounds me. Watching Supercars leave the line is an experience I’m fairly certain I’m never going to tire of, as the cars squat down on the line before leaping forward and scrabbling for traction under acceleration.

Hopes for home success in the Supercar class rested in the hands of three drivers, namely World Rallycross Championship regular Liam Doran and wildcard entrants Julian Godfrey and Guy Wilks. Wilks had been very competitive in the JRM MINI in 2015, but he didn’t look anywhere near as comfortable in the OMSE Fiesta.

Despite that Wilks was on the fringe of a semi-final position at the conclusion of qualifying three, however an issue with the car in the fourth qualifying round left him crawling round the circuit, eventually forcing Guy to pull off. With no score on the board, Wilks dropped down to seventeenth overall and outside of the all important top twelve.

The weekend wasn’t much better for Julian Godfrey, who made an uncharacteristic mistake during the opening qualifying race, ploughing straight into the barrier on the outside of Chesson’s drift. After a good hammering and a careful application of duct tape Julian was back out for his next race. Sadly he was unable to match the pace of the leaders and Godfrey eventually placed twentieth overall.

Liam Doran has always seemed to encounter difficulties at his home event. With the 2.0 litre engine he has been desperately waiting for finally available, hopes were high that Doran would now have a car capable of matching the power of the rest of the field.

Sadly, and despite the best efforts of the team, Liam was unable to give the significant crowd of British spectators something to cheer about. The preparation of the 2.0L variant of the JRM MINI seemed to be ongoing right up until the moment the car hit the track and the weekend panned out more like an extented shakedown for the car, as issues cropped up throughout the qualifiers. It was a shame to see Doran unable to challenge on home soil, but hopefully the time on track will help JRM quickly refine their latest iteration of the Countryman

It wasn’t all woes in the paddock. After a very testing weekend for Ken Block in Mettet, it was good to see him have at least a partial change of fortune for round 4. Sixteenth in the opening qualifying round wasn’t anything to get excited about, but eighth in qualifier two was much more respectable.

Seventeenth in qualifying three wasn’t the best way to start day two, but a brilliant battle with Robin Larsson in the fourth qualifying round saw him net tenth fastest time. Block leapt up the standings, finishing just outside the top twelve. It was a shame that Ken didn’t make the cut for the semi-finals, but pleasing to see him and the Focus RS RX delivering a much stronger performance than Mettet.

It was Block’s team mate Andreas Bakkerud who was to truly demonstrate the capability of the Ford Focus RS RX. Hoonigan Racing Division looked to have opted for an incredibly soft setup for the Focus at Lydden, as the car was really pitching on the turn in for the Devil’s Elbow.

It was at the chicane where the soft setup of the Focus was most apparent. The vast majority of Supercars tend to go light on the suspension here, but Bakkerud’s Focus RS RX was almost rearing up as it went through this section and rejoined the tarmac.

Clearly the setup was working for Andreas though. Top six times in the first three qualifying races was followed by a first in the fourth qualifier. Bakkerud even briefly stole the fastest lap time of the weekend from Solberg in the third qualifying race, however Petter promptly snatched that back later in proceedings.

Slotting into gaps in the timetable was stunt driver extraordianaire Terry Grant  and drift demonstrations care of Fueltopia faves Luke Woodham and Steve “Baggsy” Biagioni. The was the first time I’ve seen Baggsy’s Nissan S13 since it’s LS3 transplant and the new powerplant seemed more than capable of smoking out the spectators on the outside of Paddock Hill Bend.  

The star attraction in the paddock came care of the Retro Rallycross Championship. A regular fixture at the British Rallycross Championship rounds, the Retro team had truly outdone themselves for the World Round, gathering an array of Group B rallycross machinery for static and moving display.

The centre piece of the Retro Rallycross display was unarguably the former Will Gollop bi-turbo Metro 6R4, the very car that Will claimed the 1992 European Rallycross Championship title with. This car has been in the hands of private collector for a number of years and hasn’t seen the light of day for some time. I’m not sure how or what sort of a deal has been struck, but the beloved 6R4 of Gollop has now been fully restored and looked absolutely stunning out on track.

For me the presence of Pat Doran’s RS200, better known as “Rosie” was rather fitting, as it was this very car that convinced me to make that first journey to Lydden a decade ago. As keen as I am of some of the modern machinery, the RS200 is first rallycross car I had a yearning for and still the one that I most covet.

It was Ulrik Linnemann who won the final at the opening round of the Super 1600 Championship, but after a more consistent performance over the weekend it was Mario Barbosa who led the Championship coming to Lydden.

Barbosa’s weekend came to an abrupt end during the second semi-final when he clipped the curb on the inside of Chessons and spun his Saxo across the track. Ulrik Linnemann looked set to secure a top three place and qualify for the final until he, rather unbelievably, clipped the same curb and flipped his Peugeot through the air and on top of Mario’s stricken Saxo. With semi-final two red flagged and the result declared on the previous laps positions, Ulrik was technically third, however as he was the cause of the stoppage it was fourth place Christian Petrakovits who advanced to the final.

With the Championship leader and top qualifier out of the running, the assumed favourites for the win were second and third top qualifiers Krisztian Szabo and Artis Baumanis. Both drivers won their respective semi-finals and so sat side-by-side on the front row of the grid for the final.

Early contact between Ernestas Staponkus and Timur Shigabutdinov gave Krisztian Szabo some breathing space and, while Artis Baumanis kept Josef Susta and Christian Petrakovits at bay, Szabo pushed on. Despite the pressure from behind Baumanis was absolutely flying and, when Szabo opted for his joker on lap 5, the pair ran door-to-door for half a lap. Artis looked faster, but he couldn’t find a way past Krisztian on the last lap and so had to settle for second.

For me the Super 1600 class produced some of the best racing of the weekend. Where there is a certain among of reservation in the Supercars as machinery is preserved for the Semi-Finals, the Super 1600 drivers seemed to be absolutely on the limit from the get go.

Thomas Bryntesson has been the man to beat in RX Lites in 2016, winning the opening round of the Lite Championship and the second round in Belgium last month.

Surprisingly Bryntesson didn’t look anywhere near as dominant at Lydden, thus the result of the Lite races were to prove a lot tougher to call. Cyril Raymond posted fastest time in the opening qualifying race, a feat he went on to repeat in the third qualifier. Failing to finish the second race cost him the top qualification spot – claimed by a very consistent Simon Wago Syversen – but at the intermediate stage Raymond looked the quickest on paper.

Raymond went on to prove that point in the second semi-final, winning the race and posting a time four seconds faster than semi-final one winner Simon Olofsson. With Bryntesson back on form for the final Raymond looked like he might be beaten but, despite posting the fastest lap of the race, Thomas was pipped to the line by Cyril.

Although I had been expecting to see Guy Wilks wrestling with car setup in the unfamiliar OMSE Fiesta, I hadn’t been expecting to see the team regulars struggling. After running a relatively stiff setup in the past, the OMSE cars all looked very loose. Given the relative inexperience of the young OMSE driver pairing, I wonder if car setup is something that is dictated to them rather than chosen at this point.

Kevin Eriksson posted the best result of the OMSE Fiestas, placing ninth at the intermediate standings and going on to finish fourth in the first semi-final. It was a far cry from the results OMSE have acquired at Lydden in the past, but with such an experienced field in play the learning curve for the younger drivers must be incredibly steep.

In a mirror image of past events at Lydden, it was the Team Austria Fiestas who looked the most composed. The Fords of Janis Baumanis and Timur Timerzyanov looked balanced in both the corners and over the chicane curb, which was a far cry from the first time I saw this team appear at Lydden. Crucially both Team Austria cars made it to the semi-final stage and Timur went onto to finish fifth overall.

The Team Austria cars seem to be continually improving and with the consistency of the two team drivers, podium finishes are surely an inevitability now.

Petter Solberg continued his dominant form into the second day of racing. Petter made it three out of three by winning the third qualifier and he came close to a perfect qualification score by taking second in the fourth set of qualifiers. Setting off from the pole spot in the first semi-final, Petter led the race from start to finish. The drive was Solberg at his best: flat out and flamboyant.

Mattias Ekstrom had been conspicuous by his absence from the top spot of any of the qualifying rounds. Although Ekstrom had obviously been slowed by a puncture in the fourth qualifier, his car seemed to be running fine in the first three races. Was Solberg really that much quicker than Ekstrom, or was Mattias saving himself for the closing stages of the weekend? I suspected the latter, but it was only during the final when spectators would know for sure.

Victory in the second semi-final put Ekstrom alongside Solberg on the front row of the final. When the lights went out both drivers got a good launch and, as they arrived at the first corner, Mattias dived off into the joker lap whilst Petter remained on the normal line.

Petter certainly wasn’t hanging around but, unlike the first semi-final, it was notable that Solberg wasn’t gapping the cars behind him. The ever increasing stream of smoke from the rear end of the DS3 was also a strong indication that his tyres were rapidly approaching the end of their life.

Emerging from the joker lap with clear air between himself and Kevin Hansen in third, Mattias Ekstrom slowly began to reel in the lead trio. Up front Timmy Hansen continued to hang onto Solberg and, when Petter peeled off for his joker, Timmy took the lead while, crucially, Solberg re-joined just behind Ekstrom.

Petter held onto Mattias right up to the flag, but he couldn’t pull him in close enough to attempt a pass. When Hansen went for the joker on the final lap Ekstrom moved into the lead. With a little over a second between himself and second place Solberg, Mattias took the checkered flag to claim his third successive win of 2016.

Although the resultant points changed little in the overall Championship standings, when the dust had settled at Lydden it seemed hard to look past Ekstrom as the Championship favourite for 2016. Still, as we have seen in past seasons, fortunes can quickly change and the development of cars is an endless process.

Cementing the above point, Andreas Bakkerud subsequently claimed round five of the Championship in Norway with a dominant (and record breaking) performance following victory in all four qualifiers, semi-final and final. The win signifies that Hoonigan Racing are hitting their stride with the Focus RS RX and, if the car can consistently deliver on its potential, it seems likely that the two horse Championship race we have seen so far will be interrupted.

With the Championship approaching its midpoint, first and second position are now separated by just five points, while third to fifth are only two points apart. At this stage the scene is set for the closest World Championship title fight yet and I can’t wait to see how the rest of the season pans out. Expect more World Championship content on Fueltopia later in the year and, in the meantime, be sure to keep tabs on the latest news updates on the official World Rallycross website!

 

Want to see more of the World Rallycross Championship at Lydden? Click here for a full image gallery.